The Ultimate Barcelona Experience

One of Gaudí's earlier projects, La Pedrera incorporated innovations like a self-supported façade and underground parking.  Under renovation during our visit, this photo is from Wikicommons.

One of Gaudí’s earlier projects, La Pedrera incorporated innovations like a self-supported façade and underground parking. Under renovation during our visit, this photo is from Wikicommons.

My first surprise about Barcelona, a metropolitan area of five million people, is that the city is only about 150 years old.  The roots of the city go back to Roman times, but the city as we see it now has few remnants older than the mid-19th century. 

Gaudí loved color.  He did not much like square corners. Photo credit: Wikicommons

Gaudí loved color. He did not much like square corners.
Photo credit: Wikicommons

Barcelona underwent major changes in the 1800’s.  In a controversial move, the powers of that time decided to tear down the medieval wall that contained the city.  Along with the wall, many medieval era buildings were also demolished.  A master plan was developed which included plazas, parks and tree-lined streets that were over 100 feet wide with wide sidewalks.  Although some property owners fought these zoning restrictions, today Barcelona has lots of wide boulevards, plazas with beautiful artwork, and public parks providing spectacular vistas of the city.  The result today is a feeling of wide open spaces with lots of light, nice breezes and lots of green space throughout the city.  Further improvements were made in preparation for hosting the 1992 Olympic Summer Games, including new beaches and modern construction.

Stylish architecture is what catches my eye in Barcelona, and none is more striking than the inescapable designs of Antoni Gaudí.  I was prepared to be amazed by the unusual shapes and bright ceramic touches of Casa Batlló, Park Güell and other famous Gaudí works.  I was hardly prepared for the spectacle that is La Sagrada Familia, the Catholic Basilica of The Sacred Family.  As we walked from the nearby Paseo de Sant Joan, my heart began beating faster as the glory of spires towering more than 500 feet over my head came into view.  Everything about La Sagrada Familia demands that I look up. 

The spires of La Sagrada Familia pierce the sky over 500 feet above street level.

The spires of La Sagrada Familia pierce the sky over 500 feet above street level.

I can hardly get my head around what I am seeing.  Is this art?  Is it architecture?  Is it the creation of a crazy man or a genius?  What sort of mind is able to bring such a remarkable vision to reality?  These thoughts go through my mind as I gaze upward in amazement and awe.  Interior pillars start out five feet in diameter at their base.  As my eyes follow their upward taper, they seem to grow sixteen evenly space ridges.  These ridges split in two as I follow the lines upward.  The vertical lines then dissolve until further up the column is perfectly round.  Suddenly, the column splits into multiple branches that taper and disappear into the ceiling they support.  The effect of the multiple pillars is like a forest of giant trees supporting an elaborate ceiling 200 feet overhead.

The West entrance to Sagrada Familia is also the oldest.  It depicts the Nativity in sculptures high over the portico.

The West entrance to Sagrada Familia is also the oldest. It depicts the Nativity in sculptures high over the portico.

La Sagrada Familia was not completed in Gaudí’s lifetime.   In fact, the construction that began over 130 years ago continues to this day.  This was not a commissioned project.  Gaudí utilized only money that was donated in order to carry out the construction.  To this day only donations from entry fees and benefactors are used to pay for the construction.  It is estimated that 2.8 million persons annually visit La Sagrada Familia.  The base admission is about $27/person without a personal guide or audio guide and exclusive of a trip up one of the towers.  The two newest towers are equipped with ultra-modern elevators.

The interior of Sagrada Familia is light and open.  Color is added with the extensive use of stained glass windows.

The interior of Sagrada Familia is light and open. Color is added with the extensive use of stained glass windows.

Gaudí believed that all great efforts required sacrifice.  He felt paying the ongoing costs of constructing La Sagrada Familia was exactly the sort of sacrifice that was required to achieve success.  It is estimated the project could take ten or more years to complete.  I do not think Gaudí would mind. 

In 1926, Antoni Gaudí was struck by a tram on his way to his local church.  He was knocked unconscious and taken in a coma to the hospital.  No one recognized him at the time.  During the night he awoke and asked to have last rites administered.  He died later that night.  He is now buried in the crypt below the main altar of La Sagrada Familia.  Catholic masses are conducted there daily.

Interior columns evoke images of a forest with branches high overhead.

Interior columns evoke images of a forest with branches high overhead.

The elaborate ceiling is braced by the many-branched columns soaring 200 feet overhead.

The elaborate ceiling is braced by the many-branched columns soaring 200 feet overhead.

The colors and details throughout the cathedral dazzle the eyes/

The colors and details throughout the cathedral dazzle the eyes.

Time to Split, Croatia

A view of Split, Croatia's harbor and the Old City

A view of Split, Croatia’s harbor and the Old City

Diocletian, Emperor of Rome 284-305 AD, lived in this palace until he died in 311.  He addressed his subjects from this balcony.

Diocletian, Emperor of Rome 284-305 AD, lived in this palace until he died in 311 AD. He addressed his subjects from this balcony.

Split, the second largest city on the Dalmatian Coast of Croatia, is our point of departure by ferry to Italy later this week.  In English ‘split’ means to leave.  Although we are less than eager to leave Croatia because of the bonds of friendship we have forged here, as The 6 Monthers we must answer the call to make another country our home for the next six months.  The excitement of moving someplace new is building within us as we complete our second year of living in a new country every six months.* 

Outside The Golden Gate of Diocletian's Palace stands this statue of medieval bishop, Gregory of Nin by Ivan Meštrović, Croatia's most famous artist.

Outside The Golden Gate of Diocletian’s Palace stands this statue of medieval bishop, Gregory of Nin by Ivan Meštrović, Croatia’s most famous artist.

We have twenty days between our departure from Croatia and our scheduled arrival in Alicante, Spain.  Thus, we will use surface transportation to travel first to Italy.  I have seen Naples, Florence, Pisa, and Sicily, but I have not yet visited Rome.  Florence informs me one needs at least a week to see and appreciate Rome.  So we will do just that.  We will then take another ferry, which is more of a cruise ship, to Barcelona and divide our remaining time between Barcelona and Madrid.  In each city we plan to reunite with Spanish friends we have made during our travels.  How great is that, to have locals help us discover the wonders of their home country!

Rubbing the toe of Gregory of Nin's statue is supposed to bring good luck.

Rubbing the toe of Gregory of Nin’s statue is supposed to bring good luck.

Why Spain?  One reason is that Spanish is my only other language.  In fact, after living in Latin America for over a year I developed this habit.  Whenever someone speaks to me in a foreign language, I automatically answer in Spanish.  It seems I now have the ability to confuse others in two languages.  At least I understand the language of laughter.  Since I have learned a few words in Croatian, my pronunciation has also elicited some laughs and smiles.  Fortunately, most Croatians speak English, and many quite fluently.

Ivan Meštrović lived in what is now a museum a few block's from Split's harbor.

Ivan Meštrović lived in what is now a museum a few block’s from Split’s harbor.

If I were to attend school in Spain, my Spanish might be good enough to get me into the third grade, which is to say I have plenty of room for improvement, and I look forward to that.  The history of Spain also intrigues me.  The Iberian Peninsula played a strategic role in the expansion and development of modern civilization, and Spain ultimately served as the base of one of history’s most dominant and influential empires. 

Republic Square near Diocletian's Palace bears striking resemblance to St. Mark's Square in Venice.  Our guide says Croatia's painted it pink as a poke at the Venetians, who once ruled here.

Republic Square near Diocletian’s Palace bears striking resemblance to St. Mark’s Square in Venice. Our guide says Croatian’s painted it pink as a poke at the Venetians, who once ruled here.

Now we get to learn about this beautiful land and culture firsthand.  So many names of Spanish cities evoke thoughts of something exotic and unique – Cordoba, Seville, Granada, Valencia (the only Spanish city I have visited).  I want to visit them all and more:  Basque Country, El Camino de Santiago, and of course, the Spanish Riviera which we plan to call home for the next six months.  I expect to have many stories to share from Spain. 

If you have traveled to Spain, what was your finest memory?  If you have not visited Spain, what would you most want to see?  I would love for you to share your thoughts. 

*Note:  We created a list of countries in which we would like to live that spans the next ten years.  Link here for our list and more about The 6 Monthers.  Do you think we overlooked a country?  Tell us which country and why.  We are open to suggestions.

Traveling and Living Abroad Cheaply

Even the automobiles are preserved in historic Colonia de Sacramento, Uruguay.

Even the automobiles are preserved in historic Colonia de Sacramento, Uruguay.

My experiences traveling and living outside the United States over the past two years have provided me with some insights which I will share here. Please add ideas from your own experiences so that those who follow in our footsteps might benefit. I am not addressing traditional vacationers who travel on a larger budget and stay in more upscale resorts or who prefer cruises.

This article addresses two distinct groups:

  1. those who wish to travel abroad cheaply, and
  2. those who wish to live abroad cheaply.
We learn how easy it is to make new friends at the Backpacker Hostel in Iquique, Chile.

We learn how easy it is to make new friends at the Backpacker Hostel in Iquique, Chile.

The former group consists of those whose objective is to see some of the world on a tight budget. These folks typically backpack, camp, couch surf, utilize hostels, and travel mostly by bus. They will discover places they love and perhaps one day they will return to live for awhile.

I enjoy traveling with this group. Hostels are great places to meet travelers and there is a constant turnover of people. The hostel is a communal environment, and everyone has a story to tell. Also, hostels provide the use of a community kitchen where we can prepare food ourselves rather than eating every meal at a restaurant. Think twice about hostelling if you like to go to bed early because hostel folks are generally better at partying than us older people.

An incredible variety of fruits, nuts, vegetables, meats, etc. is sold at the Central Market in Valencia, Spain.

An incredible variety of fruits, nuts, vegetables, meats, etc. is sold at the Central Market in Valencia, Spain.

Most people decide to live abroad because it is less expensive. They have a source of income, and most often they are retired. I am a member of this group. I have spent time in a dozen countries. In each locale I ask myself the question, “Would I want to live here?” Here are some sample criteria, all of which pertain to quality of life:

  1. Is living here affordable?
  2. Would I feel comfortable going for a walk or bike ride here?
  3. Is the air clean?
  4. Are there interesting things to see and do?
  5. Is the climate agreeable?

Once you find a place where you would like to live, here are some basic tips:

It takes two Walk lights to cross the Av. 9 de Julio in downtown Buenos Aires, Argentina.

It takes two cycles of the WALK light to cross the Avenida 9 de Julio in downtown Buenos Aires, Argentina, the world’s widest boulevard.

  1. Rent, do not buy. Anything can happen to change your mind about where you wish to live. Do not get tied down until you have lived someplace for an entire year. If you decide to buy a home, make sure you fully understand the laws governing property ownership. And yes, you will probably need to consult with a local attorney, so ask around for a good one.
  2. Determine if you will need a car. Is the local transportation system reliable? You can save a lot of money doing without a car, and you can always rent a car for special outings.
  3. Learn the language. Even if you only know a few words in a foreign language, use them. And keep studying to improve. The more you learn the more you will enjoy the local culture.
  4. People typically over-pack. Go light where you can, especially with books. (Invest in an eReader.)
  5. Make sure you have a good internet connection. This is how you will stay in touch with the folks back home.
  6. Be flexible in your plans. You may discover something better than what you planned once you hit the road.
  7. Start researching now for the lifestyle you wish to pursue later. Get excited!

My blog is all about the places we have seen and the places where we have lived. We do not plan to stay in one location for more than a year, so we will not be buying a house. We are already thinking about the next place we wish to live. Until then I will be sharing my stories from Cuernavaca, Mexico.